Movie review: Prisoners

    While the first scene of “Prisoners” involves the shooting of a doe, this considerably random beginning is an ingenious way to start off a movie that speaks of, if anything, the loss of innocence.    Directed by Denis Villeneuve, the film revolves around the sudden disappearance of two young girls and the desperate but determined search to find them. Hugh Jackman stars as Keller Dover, the father of one of the missing girls, and Jake Gyllenhaal stars as police-detective Loki, who has, up until this point, not failed in solving a single assigned case, but is faced with an intellectual and emotional challenge as he struggles to handle the mystery.    To parents especially, this film is gut-wrenching as the audience watches the structure and psychology of the two families crumble as they gradually lose hope in ever finding their daughters. There is a constant and consistent looming dread concerning the fate of the young girls, especially because of the audience’s fondness of them already having been established at the start of the film as they are carried on their fathers’ shoulders and dance and sing to their own version of a Christmas song, “jingle-bells, Batman smells, Robin laid an egg.”    “Prisoners” explores blame and responsibility, as both Jackman and Gyllenhaal struggle with the guilt of failing, in their eyes, the girls who are relying on them to save them as a father and police officer.    The idea of blame surrounding mental illness is also a prominent theme in the film, when Paul Dano’s character, Alex Jones — who has difficulties in speech and interaction and is diagnosed…